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Partner violence as conversation opener for preexposure prophylaxis use among younger women

Women’s exposure to IPV (intimate partner violence) has been shown to be associated with incident HIV infection and decreased viral suppression over time. However, there are fewer publications on IPV and PrEP use. The dynamics of IPV as a possible constraint or predictor of PrEP use deserves further attention, and this manuscript starts to fill that gap.

IPV as a motivator for increased PrEP use has been shown in other Southern African studies as well – among female sex workers in Johannesburg and among university students in Lesotho. In this regard, older adolescents may be more aware of strategies to protect themselves from violence or have more agency to do so. In Kenya, women were motivated to use PrEP in the context of IPV but worried that men’s lack of awareness of PrEP could lead to relationship conflict. These findings remind us that many women demonstrate a strategic ability to navigate the complexities of violent relationships, and appreciate tools (like PrEP) that they can use when safe and desirable.

Beyond resonating with extant literature, the findings in Giovenci et al are important for a number of policy and practice reasons.

July 2022

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Database
Journal Article
Journal Article
Resource

Citation:

Women’s exposure to IPV (intimate partner violence) has been shown to be associated with incident HIV infection and decreased viral suppression over time. However, there are fewer publications on IPV and PrEP use. The dynamics of IPV as a possible constraint or predictor of PrEP use deserves further attention, and this manuscript starts to fill that gap.

IPV as a motivator for increased PrEP use has been shown in other Southern African studies as well – among female sex workers in Johannesburg and among university students in Lesotho. In this regard, older adolescents may be more aware of strategies to protect themselves from violence or have more agency to do so. In Kenya, women were motivated to use PrEP in the context of IPV but worried that men’s lack of awareness of PrEP could lead to relationship conflict. These findings remind us that many women demonstrate a strategic ability to navigate the complexities of violent relationships, and appreciate tools (like PrEP) that they can use when safe and desirable.

Beyond resonating with extant literature, the findings in Giovenci et al are important for a number of policy and practice reasons.

View Journal Article

Authors: Hatcher, A.M., Eakle, R. and Peltz, A.

Health Risks(s):

  • HIV

Product type(s):

  • ARVs
  • HIVinhibitor

Topic(s):

  • Risk
  • Social

Region(s)

  • Africa

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