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Nanomaterials Solutions for Contraception: Concerns, Advances, and Prospects

Preventing unintentional pregnancy is one of the goals of a global public health policy to minimize effects on individuals, families, and society. Various contraceptive formulations with high effectiveness and acceptance, including intrauterine devices, hormonal patches for females, and condoms and vasectomy for males, have been developed and adopted over the last decades. However, distinct breakthroughs of contraceptive techniques have not yet been achieved, while the associated long-term adverse effects are insurmountable, such as endocrine system disorder along with hormone administration, invasive ligation, and slowly restored fertility after removal of intrauterine devices. Spurred by developments of nanomaterials and bionanotechnologies, advanced contraceptives could be fulfilled via nanomaterial solutions with much safer and more controllable and effective approaches to meet various and specific needs for women and men at different reproductive stages. Nanomedicine techniques have been extended to develop contraceptive methods, such as the targeted drug delivery and controlled release of hormone using nanocarriers for females and physical stimulation assisted vasectomy using functional nanomaterials via photothermal treatment or magnetic hyperthermia for males. Nanomaterial solutions for advanced contraceptives offer significantly improved biosafety, noninvasive administration, and controllable reversibility. This review summarizes the nanomaterial solutions to female and male contraceptives including the working mechanisms, clinical concerns, and their merits and demerits. This work also reviewed the nanomaterials that have been adopted in contraceptive applications. In addition, we further discuss safety considerations and future perspectives of nanomaterials in nanostrategy development for next-generation contraceptives. We expect that nanomaterials would potentially replace conventional materials for contraception in the near future.

October 2023

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Database
Journal Article
Journal Article
Resource

Citation:

Preventing unintentional pregnancy is one of the goals of a global public health policy to minimize effects on individuals, families, and society. Various contraceptive formulations with high effectiveness and acceptance, including intrauterine devices, hormonal patches for females, and condoms and vasectomy for males, have been developed and adopted over the last decades. However, distinct breakthroughs of contraceptive techniques have not yet been achieved, while the associated long-term adverse effects are insurmountable, such as endocrine system disorder along with hormone administration, invasive ligation, and slowly restored fertility after removal of intrauterine devices. Spurred by developments of nanomaterials and bionanotechnologies, advanced contraceptives could be fulfilled via nanomaterial solutions with much safer and more controllable and effective approaches to meet various and specific needs for women and men at different reproductive stages. Nanomedicine techniques have been extended to develop contraceptive methods, such as the targeted drug delivery and controlled release of hormone using nanocarriers for females and physical stimulation assisted vasectomy using functional nanomaterials via photothermal treatment or magnetic hyperthermia for males. Nanomaterial solutions for advanced contraceptives offer significantly improved biosafety, noninvasive administration, and controllable reversibility. This review summarizes the nanomaterial solutions to female and male contraceptives including the working mechanisms, clinical concerns, and their merits and demerits. This work also reviewed the nanomaterials that have been adopted in contraceptive applications. In addition, we further discuss safety considerations and future perspectives of nanomaterials in nanostrategy development for next-generation contraceptives. We expect that nanomaterials would potentially replace conventional materials for contraception in the near future.

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Authors: Su, Z., Diao, T., McGuire, H., Yao, C., Yang, L., Bao, G., Xu, X., He, B. and Zheng, Y.

Health Risks(s):

  • Unintended Pregnancy

Product type(s):

  • Contraceptives
  • MaleBC

Topic(s):

  • Development

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