Back to Resource Center

LALAPG variant of the Human Contraception Antibody (HCA) reduces Fc-mediated effector functions while maintaining sperm agglutination activity

High rates of unintended pregnancies worldwide indicate a need for more accessible and acceptable methods of contraception. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, the Human Contraception Antibody (HCA), for use by women in vaginal films and rings for contraception. The divalent F(ab’)2 region of HCA binds to an abundant male reproductive tract-specific antigen, CD52g, and potently agglutinates sperm. Certain other antibody activities mediated by the Fc region such as mucus trapping, complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) could have beneficial or negative effects. The purpose of this study was to document HCA Fc effector functions and determine whether an engineered variant of HCA with a modified Fc region, HCA-LALAPG, retains desirable contraceptive activity while minimizing Fc-mediated effects. Fab and Fc functions were compared between HCA and HCA-LALAPG. Fab activity was assessed using sperm agglutination and modified swim-up (“sperm escape”) assays. Fc functions were assessed by CDC (sperm immobilization), ADCP, and cervical mucus penetration assays. HCA and HCA-LALAPG showed equivalent activity in assays of Fab function. In the assays of Fc function, HCA supported strong CDC, ADCP, and sperm trapping in cervical mucus whereas HCA-LALAPG demonstrated little to no activity. HCA and the HCA-LALAPG variant were both highly effective in the sperm agglutination assays but differed in Fc mediated functions. Use of the HCA-LALAPG variant for contraception in women could reduce antibody-mediated inflammation and antigen presentation but may have reduced contraceptive efficacy due to much weaker sperm trapping in mucus and complement-dependent sperm immobilization activity.

March 2023

Click for full info +

Full Info:


Resource Type:

Database
Journal Article
Journal Article
Resource

Citation:

High rates of unintended pregnancies worldwide indicate a need for more accessible and acceptable methods of contraception. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, the Human Contraception Antibody (HCA), for use by women in vaginal films and rings for contraception. The divalent F(ab’)2 region of HCA binds to an abundant male reproductive tract-specific antigen, CD52g, and potently agglutinates sperm. Certain other antibody activities mediated by the Fc region such as mucus trapping, complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) could have beneficial or negative effects. The purpose of this study was to document HCA Fc effector functions and determine whether an engineered variant of HCA with a modified Fc region, HCA-LALAPG, retains desirable contraceptive activity while minimizing Fc-mediated effects. Fab and Fc functions were compared between HCA and HCA-LALAPG. Fab activity was assessed using sperm agglutination and modified swim-up (“sperm escape”) assays. Fc functions were assessed by CDC (sperm immobilization), ADCP, and cervical mucus penetration assays. HCA and HCA-LALAPG showed equivalent activity in assays of Fab function. In the assays of Fc function, HCA supported strong CDC, ADCP, and sperm trapping in cervical mucus whereas HCA-LALAPG demonstrated little to no activity. HCA and the HCA-LALAPG variant were both highly effective in the sperm agglutination assays but differed in Fc mediated functions. Use of the HCA-LALAPG variant for contraception in women could reduce antibody-mediated inflammation and antigen presentation but may have reduced contraceptive efficacy due to much weaker sperm trapping in mucus and complement-dependent sperm immobilization activity.

View Journal Article

Authors: Mausser, E., Nador, E., Politch, J.A., Pauly, M.R., Marathe, J.G., Moench, T.R., Zeitlin, L., Whaley, K.J. and Anderson, D.J.

Health Risks(s):

  • Unintended Pregnancy

Product type(s):

  • Contraceptives
  • IVR
  • VaginalFilm

Topic(s):

  • DrugInteractions
  • Development

Back to Resource Center